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July 2015

Free Trial Mandarin Class To help students to know about our Chinese Lessons, we offer free trial class to anyone who is keen to learn Mandarin Date: 29th July 2015 @ 7pm Venue: The Octagon Building level 18, 105 Cecil Street Topic: "How to introduce yourself in Mandarin" Free Mandarin course notes will be given. Hurry book your seat now, quickly send us your enquiry or click at below link to Register "Book Trial Class"

Learning Chinese Mandarin has 4-5 primary tones. Say the first tone as if you were singing a high note. The second tone is pronounced like a question in English, with your pitch rising at the end of the syllable. Third tones are low and extended, noticeably longer than the other tones because of the dip. The fourth tone is said abruptly and forcefully, like a curt command in English. The neutral tone's pitch depends on the tone that precedes it. It is described more fully below, but, in general, they are

Learn Mandarin Vocabulary By learning phrases that contain vocabulary will help to make your communication understood by context, even if your tones are a bit off at first. Chinese, like other languages, has many words that have the same/similar meaning but are used in particular contexts. Therefore, most students will find it more efficient to learn vocabulary "in context", meaning in phrases where the vocabulary is used. Unlike some other languages (such as French or Spanish), there is absolutely no connection between English and Chinese vocabulary (aside from random coincidence and a handful

Chinese Classes Singapore Grammatical Rules The complexity of Chinese vocabulary is partially offset by the simplicity of its grammatical structure. And in languages full of exceptions-to-rules (especially in Cantonese), you'll advance more quickly by absorbing a "feeling" for grammatical structure through practice and exposure, rather than intellectual understanding of rules. It's simply more effective to learn how to speak Chinese in the manner that a child learns to speak and language - by listening and repeating what you hear over and over. Imagine asking a seven-year-old if a noun goes before a verb