Higher Mandarin Language For Adults Vocabulary Series

28 Sep Higher Mandarin Language For Adults Vocabulary Series

Higher Mandarin Language For Adults Vocabulary Series

Higher Mandarin Language For Adults Vocabulary Series

In this first part of our Mandarin for Adults Vocabulary Series, we are going to introduce five common polyphones and teach you how to use them properly. What needs to be mentioned is that having a good command of the most commonly used Chinese polyphones will be of great help in learning Chinese at the intermediate level.

1) 好

This character has two different pronunciations, hao3 and hao4. Each one has its own special meaning, and both forms of this character will combine with other words and form many common phrases that are used in daily life. The tone hao3 means well or good. The most frequently used phrases are 好的 hao3de1 and 好看 hao3 kan4. And the tone hao4 means that someone likes to do something. For instance, 好读书 hao4 du2 shu1. Here hao4 is a verb and it means “good at”, or “to love”.

2) 假

With two distinct tones, jia3 and jia4, this character is easy to read and remember. Jia3, often spoken in Chinese, which means “fake”. It can be used as an adjective, such as the phrase, 假如 jia3 ru2. It can be used as a noun such as, Jia4, 假期 jia4 qi1, which means “vacation”.

3) 脏

This character has two pronunciations. They are zang1 and zang4. The first tone, zang1, means that something is really dirty and is an adjective. The second tone, zang4, is usually used as a noun such as, 心脏 xin1 zang4, which means “heart”.

4) 长

This character has two different pronunciations, chang2 and zhang3. As for chang2, means long and can be used as an adjective. For example, 长头发 chang2 tou2 fa, means long hair. And zhang3, which means “grow” and can be used as a verb. For example, 长大 zhang3 da4, which means “grow up”.

5) 要

This character has two distinct tones, yao4 and yao1. yao4 means “want” in Chinese. For example, 我要上学, wo3 yao4 shang4 xue2, means “I want to go to school”. And yao1, we usually say 要求, means demand or require.

Chinese Negation: The Different Uses of Méiyou and Bù

Chinese negation words 没有【méiyǒu】and 不 【bù】are commonly used to negate something. Here you learn when to use them, including 还没有【hái méiyǒu】, 还不【hái bù】, 从来没有【cónglái méiyǒu】and 从来不【cónglái bù】.

Chinese uses different forms for negative action, depending on if the action is in the perfect aspect of a tense or the simple tense.

The negation word 没有 【méiyǒu】or its shorter form 没【méi】has several meanings depending on the grammar structure, as follows:

  1. It means “not” for 没有【méiyǒu】+ Verb. It’s generally used for the negative of the past tense.
  2. It means “has/have not done yet” for 还【hái】+ 没有 【méiyǒu】+ Verb. It’s generally used for the negative of the present perfect tense.
  3. It means “not have” for 没有【méiyǒu】+ Noun. Generally, it’s used for the negative of the past tense, present tense and future tense.

Negation in Chinese 不 【bù】means “not” when it’s used before verbs to negate them. It’s generally used for present tense and future tense whereas 还【hái=still】+不【bù=not】+ Verb means “still do/does not”.

从来没有 【cónglái méiyǒu=has/have never, never】…… 过【guò】or its shorten form从来没 【cónglái méi】…… 过【guò】is used for things you have not ever experienced. It allows for the possibility of something occurring in the future.

从来不 【cónglái bù=would never, always not】is used for would never happen. It doesn’t allow for the possibility of something occurring in the future.

That’s it. Some new Chinese words for you to learn in our first part of Mandarin language for Adults Vocabulary Series. We hope you’ve learned something! Check back to this blog for more articles like this.

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